Dyslexia : A Paill Spectrum symptom Web Avatars: Erasmus and Kinkajou Erasmus and Kinkajou

Dyslexia. . . . . .

Dyslexia . . . . . . .

Erasmus Erasmus : Dyslexia is a little understood and little appreciated condition amidst the medical fraternity. Doctors are often unfamiliar with how to test for or diagnose the condition.
Patients are very unwilling to accept that they have any problem at all.

The Dyslexic Alefbet

Can children who have a problem with spelling , have other learning problems??

Dr XxxxxDR Xxxxx : Self Diagnosis of Dyslexia: Back to Dyslexia top   

The syndrome of dyslexia is different in children, than in adults.  In adults, the condition is stable, chronic, and persistent, except where a stroke may have occurred.  Strokes are extremely rare in children. The Paill Spectrum disease model pioneered by Dr. Xxxxx states that once the deficits have become hard wired, they are there for life.

Dyslexia tends to be a much more variable and changing condition in children.  Many adults give a history of schooling problems and have had the dyslexia since childhood.  In children, the condition has no known cause and no known treatment.  The Paill Spectrum model of disease as developed by Dr. Xxxxx suggests that it appears the condition is caused by Paill Spectrum infection.  Dyslexia is usually defined as an "inability to read" in someone who is expected to know how to read. 

Dyslexia in children however also causes characteristic problems in writing and in word recognition.  There are substantial learning problems in these children.  Dr. Xxxxx's tests for dyslexia are clinical “rapid screening tests” that will allow the average adult to check their own child for this condition.  In my experience, the deterioration is very acute.  As is seen in the cases on the web site,
(Case II): Paill Dyslexia, one week the child is the best speller and cleverest child in the class.  The next week, this child becomes consistently the worst speller in the class.  Often mood and personality changes are obvious in acute stages.

Many adults often notice these, but the significance is not recognised.  The condition is critical to recognise, as early-diagnosed cases are very amenable to Paill Spectrum treatment.  This stops the damage process.  With normal growth and development, much of the damage seems to be “grown out of” with time, if the original damage process is halted. 

Dr XxxxxDR Xxxxx : Dyslexia: New Treatments

The Paill Spectrum model says Dyslexia is an easy condition to diagnose and treat. :-& Most doctors would reliably miss every case they see. Using the Paill Spectrum model, a diagnosis can be made in minutes by parents or teachers and even doctors. Currently, specialist neuropsychiatrists document the children's deficits, ( brain damage in the Paill Spectrum model), and still miss the key deficits of the diagnosis of dyslexia. Most doctors and psychologists have no understanding of what is going on in the children's heads and so are not even aware of what clinical features are critical in making the diagnosis. Dyslexia is usually regarded as a condition where children cannot read or write. But in the Paill Spectrum model there is a specific reason that the children cannot read or write. This is related to memory dysfunction and cross linking in symbolic speech processing in the brain of the victims.

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Dr XxxxxDR Xxxxx : Dyslexia: Children with dyslexia, learning difficulties, spelling problems, maths problems, developmental delay, school problems may be suffering from the treatable medical condition Paill Spectrum. Other terms used to describe this condition may include language difficulties and learning disability in children, poor memory, disability, reading difficulties, spelling errors, writing problems or difficulties, word recognition failure, unable to read or auditory processing deficits

Other Symptoms are chronic fatigue, tiredness, sleepy, memory loss, dizziness or loss of balance, clumsiness, easy bruising, aches and pains such as sore elbows, sore chest, abdominal pain and sore Achilles tendons.

Nutritional therapy alone can result in substantial improvements in performance over 3-6 months in the school performance.

Remedial teaching, tutoring and extra study are the only "current" accepted treatments for the condition dyslexia. Often the children are just regarded as naughty and stupid, as their memory problems are not appreciated. Speech therapy may have a role in the treatment of these children but does not address the underlying problems.

Dr XxxxxDR Xxxxx : Dyslexia Test Sequence: (Phone Number Test):
Back to Dyslexia top 

Testing for Dyslexia

Set up nice quiet place for the test.  Make sure there are no interruptions.  The school age child needs a pen and paper.  The adult giving the test chooses a list of numbers at random and writes down these numbers.  The numbers must be long enough to “stretch” the child’s performance.  For example, use 4-5 numbers for a first grade child.  Adults need 7-8 numbers to display dyslexic damage. (To test a child, you need to push the envelope of the child's capabilities. Simple forgetting gives a very different pattern of result to Paill Spectrum dyslexia) :-)

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Many people feel dyslexia is unimportant. Many people feel that it is just a problem with spelling. The Paill Spectrum model says the condition of dyslexia has serious consequences both short term and long term for children. :-& :-[ :-| "" :-]









Back to Dyslexia top 

Child in pool: distinctly different: maybe colour dyslexia

New Disease Paill Spectrum affects Language in Children:

Dyslexia

Kinkajou Kinkajou : What Else Can You Tell Me About Dyslexia? :-X

Dr XxxxxDR Xxxxx : In the Paill Spectrum Model, Paill Spectrum young children causes severe learning, attention, memory, and behavioural problems.  In an unlucky few with more extensive disease, it causes “short circuits” in the processing of “speech symbols”.  This gives rise to a condition that most people know as dyslexia.  There is a good summary of Paill Spectrum Dyslexia on the Web Site. 

Do the test suggested on the web site each few months, because
PaillSpectrum Dyslexia develops acutely (quickly) .(See Case II: Paill Dyslexia for a typical description of an acute / rapid onset dyslexia).


Dr XxxxxDR Xxxxx : Prognosis Without Treatment Back to Dyslexia top 

Untreated victims of Paill Spectrum have lifelong problems with language and speech.  The Paill Spectrum organism left untreated can cause immense suffering and disability that children do not have to live with.  Dyslexic children become dyslexic adults.  As an adult, they will often end up working in menial jobs throughout their life due to their poor linguistic skills.

Dyslexia is a very poorly identified and poorly managed learning problem in young children.  Many of these Paill Spectrum victims often undergo extensive auditory and Specialist assessments, with no useful result.

The lucky few may receive speech therapy, but many receive no treatment at all.  They become adults who cannot remember phone numbers without scrambling the sequence of numbers.  Many grow into adults who cannot spell and have severe problems with reading and writing.  :-Z


Prognosis
Very Good with Treatment :-) Back to Dyslexia top   

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Identification

This Paill Spectrum condition is easily identifiable using a simple clinical test.  The condition responds readily to Paill Spectrum treatment.  (i.e. Nutritional and Antibiotic therapies).

Dyslexia is just about reading and spelling , isn't it? : No

Shadow Views: a new way of seeing things: like dyslexic children
I have other symptoms: Can I check for these?
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Has this work been presented at any conferences?

Dr XxxxxDR Xxxxx : Medical Treatment of Dyslexia Like Syndromes In Early Childhood

Author: Dr. Xxxxx

Contemporary Research Paper Back to Dyslexia top 

Purpose:
To assist early childhood educators to identify treatable dyslexia-like symptoms in childhood.

Objectives:

Simple assessment techniques rapidly reveal children who have characteristic, significant, and medically treatable learning disabilities. Nutritional factors important to treatment can often be addressed by the provision of basic information to both parents and children. Medical therapy needs to be followed by intensive education of affected children.

Methods:

Long term work with Medical Practice patients has allowed identification of a characteristic symptom cluster. Longitudinal case control observations of these identified patients has further identified consistent patterns in responses to treatment. Back to Dyslexia top   

Results and Findings:

Simple recall testing of numerical sequences reveals a characteristic pattern of memory errors. These errors are easily identified and are unique to the dyslexia-like symptom pattern identified. The symptom intensity is variable. Many children do not complain of symptoms and cases must be suspected and identified by doctors, teachers, and educators.

Failure to identify affected children results in a very poor outlook for the affected children from their treatable learning disability. Social complications for the affected children also occur. These include: sleepiness, tiredness, poor memory, lower physical activity, mood changes, and irritability. Many of these children will often have low weight in spite of their relative physical inactivity, due to basic underlaying nutritional problems. Back to Dyslexia top 

The symptom cluster is associated with a characteristic profile of pathology blood test results.

The challenge in early childhood education is to identify the symptoms  early and to  prevent progressive worsening of the learning disability.

Learn about New Technology in Illness and Human Behaviour. WWW.ENKtechs.COM " Paill"

 



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Case II: Paill Dyslexia

This young girl was the brightest, cleverest and best speller in the class. After an attack of Paill Spectrum Dyslexia, she had extreme trouble remembering words. She improved on Paill Spectrum treatment.

This little girl has presented with acute dyslexia. This is an episode of "2nd wave" damage due to Paill Spectrum infection. There is a background of wheat (gluten) allergy. The condition improved markedly on antibiotics and nutritional therapy.
Back to Dyslexia top 

Dr XxxxxDR Xxxxx : Presentation USA: Paill Spectrum Dyslexia

Paill Spectrum Dyslexia develops: Paill Spectrum Dyslexia : a clinical picture

Paill Spectrum Dyslexia testing 1

Paill Spectrum Dyslexia testing 2 Back to Dyslexia top 

Paill Spectrum Dyslexia testing 3Paill Spectrum Dyslexia testing 4


Paill Spectrum Dyslexia Treatment
For More Clinical Information: See :>>

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Symptoms
Dietary hintsDcotors Management Protocol










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Dr XxxxxDR Xxxxx : CENTRAL AUDITORY PROCESSING ASSESSMENT AND ADVICE

Sample Test Result For An Imaginary Patient :Peter

ASSESSMENTS FOR HEARING: These form a basic initial assessment of a child who is believed to have dyslexia or speech/language difficulties.

Peter presents with normal hearing thresholds across the speech frequency range in both ears.

Peter scored within the acceptable range for speech discrimination – the identification of single words in quiet listening conditions. 

Dichotic Digits (DD): In this test pairs of numbers (1 to 9, except the number 7), are presented to both ears at the same time. This test measures the ability to process information presented to both ears simultaneously, with the sounds (numbers) being presented to each ear being different.

Pitch Pattern sequence Test (PPS):

This test asks the child to report the pattern of three tone sounds presented to each ear individually, in one of six combinations e.g. low-high-low. It assesses the processing of frequency discrimination, temporal ordering and linguistic labelling. These skills relate to the child's ability to recognise acoustic contours such as rhythm, timing, stress and intonation, which are important in understanding the meaning of a sentence.

Result: The child performed very poorly on this test and the test had to be aborted. There were no correct results from either ear. The child was completely unable to identify the sequence pattern or to transfer this information across to the language area of the brain. The child was able to correctly respond to questions about two tone sequences e.g. high-low 100% of the time.

Random Gap Detection Test (RGDT):

Several pairs of tones are presented to the child (via earmuffs). The child is required to indicate whether one or two sounds were heard. The silent pause between each pair of tones increases and decreases in duration, until the smallest time interval that can be identified between two tones is reached. This test explores the process of temporal resolution. This is important in phoneme recognition and thus the perception of speech.

Normal listeners have a gap detection threshold of between 2 to 20 msec.
Our test subject for example could not detect any gaps across the test range of 2 to 40 msec.

Selective Auditory Attention Test (SAAT):

This test assesses selective attention in hearing in a quiet environment and in the presence of a competing message e.g. a story about crocodiles. The child is required to discriminate between six similarly sounding words in these two different listening environments.

e.g. Score:
100% in quiet and 38% in noise
Percentile rank < 5%
With the addition of a competing noise source (speaker), the child's ability to discriminate between similar words was severely affected.

Paediatric Sentence Identification: (PSI):

A sentence describing one of five set pictures is presented to the listener. At the same time, a different sentence, not talking about the set picture is presented to the other ear. This monaural low redundancy speech tests assesses the ability; to perceive a whole message when a portion of the auditory signal is missing or distorted. e.g. When the speaker has an accent or is slurring their speech

Example Test Result
Right Ear:
9
5% Correct at 0dB Message/ Background Noise competition Ratio
55% Correct at –10dB Message/ Background Noise competition Ratio

Left Ear:
95% Correct at 0dB Message/ Background Noise competition Ratio
35% Correct at –10dB Message/ Background Noise competition Ratio

When the competing noise (Speaker) became louder than the “Task” voice, the child was unable to maintain focus and concentration. The child’s ability to “identify sentences” was significantly worsened despite the repetitive nature of the task, the small number of the test items and the assistance of picture clues and sentence cues. Back to Dyslexia top 

Time Compressed Sentence Test (TCST)

In this test, compressed sentences are presented to each ear. Compressed sentences are accelerated or “speeded up” without a change in pitch. This assessment explores the child’s ability to understand acoustically distorted (Sound distorted) speech or rapid rates of speech. This happens for example, when someone is speaking quickly.

Sample Test Result:
Right Ear
85% correct at 40% time compression
75% correct at 60% time compression

Left Ear
80% correct at 40% time compression
68% correct at 60% time compression

This child is scoring below the range of normal for each ear. This indicates a weakness in auditory closure. This is the ability to use context (speech environment) clues to understand speech that is difficult to listen to despite the lack of background noise.

Auditory Numbers Forward:

This test assesses rote memory of non-meaningful sounds in a sequence, such as in a list of numbers that gradually increases in length.
This child scored at the 5th percentile.

Auditory Numbers Reversed

This test assesses attention to and brain manipulation of heard material, such as a list of numbers that gradually increases in length. As the number sequences are dictated, the child needs to repeat them back to the speaker in reverse order. This reflects working memory skills, (a very short term of memory which stores memories such as numbers just long enough for us to understand them).

Percentile rank: 10% scored by this example child

Auditory Sentence Memory:

This test assesses rote recall of meaningful material in sequence, such as sentences. Sentences give context clues that assist memory

This child scored at the 5th percentile for this test, which is significantly below averages for children her age. Visual imagery and verbal rehearsal can be used and the test repeated. The poor sentence recall result indicates that the child is unable to utilize language contextual clues to assist memory function.

Percentiles:

For those of you have not run across this concept: A percentile is a value on a scale of one to one hundred that indicates a percentage of e.g. children who have scored lower than the given test result. Thus a percentile above 75th is considered above normal and a percentile below the 25th is regarded as below normal. The 50th Percentile is regarded as average or normal.

In Summary, Peter's results indicate significant central auditory processing weaknesses in all areas of assessment, which would be considerably impacting on learning ability.

Results show the child can hear sounds, words and sentences and repeat them back.

However, the child falls well behind peers of similar age, when required to derive meaning from the speech and understand the gist of what has been said

Peter has poor temporal processing skills, which means he/she is unable to detect subtle timing, rhythm, stress and intonation changes.  These cues allow us to discriminate between similar words for example time/dime past/fast and can also mean the difference between a statement and a question.  Differences in stress patterns can help the listener identify key words as well as change the meaning of the message.  Intonation provides cues about the speaker’s intent and the emotional colour of a conversation.

Peter's results also indicated a weakness in interhemispheric communication within the brain.  The child had difficulty transferring information from the spatial area to the language area of the brain and showed a weakness in integrating and separating information presented to each side simultaneously. 

Behaviourally, children with binaural integration weakness have difficulty bringing information together, such as sound symbol association or a connection between their emotional affect and their speech.  They also take longer to answer questions and they need more time to integrate information to formulate and answer.  In response, the child will often ask for repeats to clarify intent and buy extra time, even though they actually heard the question or statement in the first place.

Peter experienced difficulty in the task of auditory closure

In the selective auditory attention test, the child was required to discriminate between sets of six similar words. For example: rocks socks box fox locks docks.  IN quiet listening conditions, the child was able to successfully identify each item across the test.  However when a background speaker was introduced, the child found the task of concentrating of the task, voice and using the auditory cues to identify the words difficult.  As this test involved words not sentences, the child did not have contextual cues or intrinsic redundancy to assist. 

If in a difficult listening environment, the child misunderstands a key word in a phrase or question, he/she may totally lose the thread of the discussion and become very confused. 
Back to Dyslexia top 

The child also demonstrated a significant weakness in auditory memory skillsAuditory memory refers to the ability to retain, recall and sequence auditory material.  The 3 most important factors that influence auditory memory are meaning, length and complexity.  The more meaningful the material, the shorter the presentation and the simpler the language, the easier it will be to remember.  An auditory memory deficiency may result in several difficulties, such as:

This child may also have difficulty with reading comprehension if he/she is not able to remember what was read in the previous passage, paragraph or chapter.  Auditory memory is also critical in developing and understanding of cause and effect or consequence, and one’s ability to mentally plan and organise one’s self and work. 

In view of the significant weaknesses observed across the auditory processing spectrum, further language and cognitive assessments are recommended for this child. So after all this incredibly complicated assessment of deficits and problems, no-one still knows what caused the problem with the child. The only treatment is education, which will obviously often fail due to "bad parenting", if the opinion of the educators is sought. The parents in turn generally blame poor teaching. then again perhaps the kid is just another dumb kid. Where can the real answers lie.

SO WHAT CAN BE DONE TO HELP THIS CHILD :
GENERAL CLASSROOM TIPS/MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES

Memory Improvement Strategies

The child may benefit from employing several memory strategies to enhance the retention of information.  These include:

Interhemispheric Exercises for Assisting the Child

Interhemispheric exercises can be a fun way to practice at home with parent and/or sibling involvement.







Noise desensitization

This may benefit a child with poor speech discrimination in noisy environments.  It involves gradually building a tolerance for a variety of types and levels of noise and then having the child perform harder and harder tasks in those noises.

Begin with noise similar to that produced by an air conditioner (white noise) and progress to a middle ground type of noise that varies a little in frequency and volume but repeats a pattern, like the noise rain makes when falling or a dishwasher noise.  Finally with a cafeteria type noise, noisy playground type noise or noisy classroom type noise which is the most difficult to tolerate. 
Back to Dyslexia top 

Temporal Patterning Training

Children with temporal patterning deficits tend to have difficulties recognizing the acoustic contours of speech, the prosodic aspects of speech (such as rhythm, stress and intonation) and a general difficulty discriminating subtle changes in sound.  The following activities can be helpful.  Variations on the theme are encouraged, particularly if your child becomes bored with a particular activity.  Start with the simplest activity e.g. discrimination between same vs different and move on once that task has been mastered. 

The goal of Temporal Patterning Training is for the child to first discriminate differences in and the analyse and imitate, rhythmic patterns of sound.  Begin with short (three elements) patterns that may be clapped, tapped on the table or done in any manner that will hold the child’s attention.  Play games or perform activities that involve listening to the differences in the sounds.

For example:

Once the child has mastered discrimination and imitation of non verbal sounds, introduce sequences of words.  The child’s task may to be to determine which of three words was different e.g. tick tack tick.  Begin with words that are easiest to discriminate and them move to more difficult stimuli e.g. pen pin pen. 

Introduce sentences of three or four words, once of which has more stress placed on it, then the others.  The child’s task is not to derive meaning from the sentences but merely to indicate which of the four words was emphasized.  The same sentence may be used over and over again, each time stressing a different word e.g. YOU are going home, You ARE going home, you are GOING home, you are going HOME.  Back to Dyslexia top 

Following work with words, focus on sentences in which subtle difference in stress temporal cuing or other prosodic features alter the meaning of the entire sentence e.g. Don’t touch that BOOK versus Don’t touch THAT book . At first the stress and rhythm characteristics of each sentence will need to be exaggerated.  However, once the child becomes familiar with the task, the activities may be said in a more natural tone of voice.  The child should be led step by step by through the analysing the sentences for meaning depending on the stress and rhythm characteristics.  For example, in the sentence “Don’t touch that BOOK,” the implication is that the listener is not to touch books, although he may be permitted to touch other items.  However, in the sentence “Don’t touch THAT book,” it is clear that the listener is not touch one book in particular, although the other books bay be allowed. 

Direction following games are good task helping to develop pattern recognition and order recognition. 

Auditory Closure Activities

Management of an auditory closure difficulty should include methods to improve access to auditory information through environmental modifications activities targeted at auditory closure, preteaching of new concepts and frequent repetitions of key messages.

The purpose of auditory closure activities is to assist the child is learning to fill in the missing parts of a message in order to perceive a meaningful whole.  The activities should be presented in a sequential fashion from least difficult to most difficult.  The child should demonstrate mastery of one level before moving to the next. Back to Dyslexia top 

Missing word Exercises.

These exercises are designed to teach the child to use context to fill in the missing word in a message.  It is best to begin with very familiar subject matter and then move to new information.  For example, when working with a very young child, the teacher/parent may wish to begin with familiar songs or nursery rhymes in order to familiarize the child with the task of listening to the whole in order to predict the missing part.  For example, the following rhymes may be used:

In these examples, the child’s task would be to fill in the missing word.  It may surprise some teachers/parents  to find that, even with a great amount of external redundancy due to familiarity of the message, some children will exhibit difficulty with even this simple task.  In this case, and at all stages of auditory closure activities, the child should be talked through the process and prompted with questions such as, “what word comes next when you sing the song?”, “What word would rhyme with “Horner” and make sense of this sentence?”.

A slightly more advanced activity is to predict rhyming words.  For example the teacher/parent may ask the child, “Can you name an animal that rhymes with house?” If the child is unable to perform the task, prompts should be given that guide the child in solving the puzzle.  For example, the child may be instructed to begin at the beginning of the alphabet and substitute the initial consonant of the word with different letters until the correct consonant is reached. (aouse, bouse, couse, douse etc.).  If the child is demonstrating difficulty with the concept of rhyming, the initial consonant of the target word, in this case "M", may be provided for the child, requiring him/her to add it to the remainder of the word "ouse" to derive the whole “mouse”.  A third method is prompting.

A useful strategy for when the child correctly chooses an initial consonant and combine it with the remainder of the word to derive a meaningful, but incorrect word (e.g. douse), may be to draw the child’s attention to the key word or words in the clue.  In this situation, the teacher/parent would remind the child that while douse is indeed a word that rhymes with house, what is wanted here is an animal.  Some examples of stimuli that may be used in this activity are as follows:

Once mastery of these steps has been demonstrated, the teacher/parent may move to new unfamiliar messages in which the child must us the context of the phrase, sentence, or paragraph in order to predict the missing component.  When using this approach the teacher/parent should begin with simple sentences (e.g. “When I’m hungry, I ……………”), then more to more complex material, such as paragraphs in text books or popular novels.  In addition, the teacher/parent should progress from omitting the subject or object of the sentence of phrase e.g. “Jill hit the ………..with a bat”, to omissions of verbs, adjectives and other parts of the message e.g. “Jill ……….. the ball with a bat”; “The water was so ………………, it took his breath away”.  The child should be prompted continually to use context to predict missing components, as well as to derive meaning from the whole message.  In addition, materials appropriate for this exercise can be take from classes in which the child is demonstrating difficulty, in order to assist the child further in the understanding the class material. 

Missing Syllable Exercises

Once the child has demonstrated that he/she can predict a missing word based on context, the teacher/parent may move to omission of syllables. As with missing words, missing syllable exercises should be presented in a progression from least to most difficult.  Initially, the context should be familiar so that the child is best able to fill in the missing components of the target word.  The teacher/parent may find that, even if the child is able to predict an entire missing word from a sentence easily, she may have great difficulty when only a portion of the target word is omitted.   In addition, achieving closure of words in which the initial syllable is omitted is a more difficult task than for words in which the final syllable is omitted.  Therefore, the teacher/parent should begin by omitting the final syllable of the target word and, once mastery is achieved, move to omission of middle and initial syllables. 

The teacher/parent may begin with sentences in which the target word is embedded e.g. there are 26 letters in the al-pha-….., and then gradually move to single words in which the only contextual cue may be a category designation e.g. sports: base……, soc……., ten…….  Gradually the child learns to become less dependent on hearing and decoding every component of the target word and more aware of the need  to use the surrounding context of the message if parts of it are unclear. Back to top 

Missing Phoneme Exercises

Exercised in which specific phonemes are omitted may be carried out in a similar fashion to the missing syllable exercises.  Again, it is best to use a progression of least to most difficult, moving to the next stage only when the child has demonstrated mastery of the previous stage.  Therefore, the child should be able to supply the missing phonemes in words with contextual cues e.g. “I like to (w)atch (t)ele(v)ision”, before moving on to isolated words.  With these exercised, tape-recording the target sentences or words may be useful, as it may be difficult to perform the necessary phonemic omissions using a live voice approach. 
Again, when focusing on isolated words, it is helpful to provide general categories as a contextual cue e.g. Animals: ti(g)er, (m)on(k)ey, and to require master with final phonemes prior to moving on to middle and initial phonemes.

Other Auditory Closure Activities

Auditory closure activities may be performed in distracting or noisy situations to increase the difficulty of the task further.  In addition, variations in speakers, such as the introduction of accents, pronunciation errors, and other speaker-related characteristics may be utilized to help train the child to use context to achieve auditory closure. Back to Dyslexia top 

Vocabulary Building

An Activity that falls within the category of auditory closure activities is Vocabulary Building.  Just as a word may be indecipherable due to missing syllables or phonemes, requiring the listener to use context to predict the word, a word may be indecipherable due to the child’s lack of familiarity with the word or subject itself.  Back to Dyslexia top 

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The Paill Spectrum Disease Model has been developed by Dr. Xxxxx. It will be some time before the knowledge of the syndrome becomes independently tested and accepted. Disclaimer





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Erasmus Erasmus : Dyslexia: New Treatments

The Paill Spectrum model says Dyslexia is an easy condition to diagnose and treat. :-& Most doctors would reliably miss every case they see. Using the Paill Spectrum model, a diagnosis can be made in minutes by parents or teachers and even doctors. Currently, specialist neuropsychiatrists document the children's deficits, ( brain damage in the Paill Spectrum model), and still miss the key deficits of the diagnosis of dyslexia. Most doctors and psychologists have no understanding of what is going on in the children's heads and so are not even aware of what clinical features are critical in making the diagnosis. Dyslexia is usually regarded as a condition where children cannot read or write. But in the Paill Spectrum model there is a specific reason that the children cannot read or write. This is related to memory dysfunction and cross linking in symbolic speech processing in the brain of the victims.


Erasmus Erasmus : Dyslexia: Children with dyslexia, learning difficulties, spelling problems, maths problems, developmental delay, school problems may be suffering from the treatable medical condition Paill Spectrum. Other terms used to describe this condition may include language difficulties and learning disability in children, poor memory, disability, reading difficulties, spelling errors, writing problems or difficulties, word recognition failure, unable to read or auditory processing deficits

Dr XxxxxDR Xxxxx : Other Symptoms are chronic fatigue, tiredness, sleepy, memory loss, dizziness or loss of balance, clumsiness, easy bruising, aches and pains such as sore elbows, sore chest, abdominal pain and sore Achilles tendons.

Nutritional therapy alone can result in substantial improvements in performance over 3-6 months in the school performance.

Erasmus Erasmus : Remedial teaching, tutoring and extra study are the only "current" accepted treatments for the condition dyslexia. Often the children are just regarded as naughty and stupid, as their memory problems are not appreciated. Speech therapy may have a role in the treatment of these children but does not address the underlying problems.

Erasmus Erasmus : Kinkajou Kinkajou: Dr XxxxxDR Xxxxx : Dr AXxxxx Dr AXxxxx Numbat Goo Goo: :
:Frobisher BeethovenBeethoven and Frobisher Frobisher Beethoven Commandant Beethoven, The Commandant and Frobisher
The Commandant
The Commandant :

Every Little bit helps. If you want answers , help us to get them for you. Erasmus & Kinkajou need support if they are to keep bringing information to you online. Please donate.

 

Erasmus Erasmus : Dyslexia is a disease which for most doctors has no definition. In the defence of doctors, there are also lots of paraprofessionals and psychologists with much knowledge (very profitable) but no understanding of the condition either.
Dr XxxxxDR Xxxxx : A common description is that these people are “unable to read or write’. Obviously you would just need to teach them better. A better description is that damaged brains don’t work real well.


Dr XxxxxDR Xxxxx : True but frightening. Children with dyslexia have a scrambling of their brain’s ability to process symbolic memory. Typically letters and number get confused in their description and get misremembered. An affected child will have mistakes (typical and recurring) when they try to repeat a sequence of number or language symbols. They also confuse abstract symbols such as:
b = d . . 6 = 9
E = 3 . . 2 = 5
b = p . . 1 = 7
Or just write their numbers or letters backwards or upside down.

Dr XxxxxDR Xxxxx : It is easy to see these children burn many cycles or brain processing just trying to remember which way the number is up / down or facing. Then to remember sequences becomes as real challenge.


Dyslexia: Children with dyslexia, learning difficulties, spelling problems, maths problems, developmental delay, and school problems may be suffering from the treatable medical condition Paill Spectrum. The Paill Spectrum theory discusses a new theory to explain dyslexia, language difficulties and learning disability in children covering aspects of: symptoms, signs, diagnosis, treatment .Doctors can change manBy aspects of the disease or illness.

Dr AXxxxx Dr AXxxxx If they know what they are doing? And generally it's not.


Dr XxxxxDR Xxxxx : The Paill Spectrum model of course also predicts that these children may also have Other Symptoms such as are chronic fatigue, tiredness, being sleepy, having memory loss, being clumsy or, easy bruising,  Nutritional therapy alone can result in substantial improvements in performance over 3-6 months in the school performance of these children. Remedial teaching, tutoring and extra study are the only current treatments for this condition. Often the children are just regarded as naughty and stupid, as their memory problems are not appreciated

Dr AXxxxx Dr AXxxxx Paill is just an awesome disease!